Hivos Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia

Renewable Energy

Women’s Condition in Sumba

Approximately one hour east of Tambolaka airport, you can find the Renewable Energy Kiosk, Yofi Mayu Delo. Sitting down in front the kiosk, Mama Margaretha, a 44-year old mother of four, winces as she recalls her life journey.

“My parents, and especially my father, did not give his blessing when I got married.  Because my husband was working as a mason, I think my dad thought that I would suffer”, she says.

Sumba, due its remote location, has never been a priority for the Indonesian government. Until a few years ago, most of the villages in Sumba didn’t even have access to electricity, which meant that as soon as night came, all activities had to stop. Once the island started developing, this presented a huge handicap, so officials had to pay attention to the energy needs of the local community.

(Photo by Tamara Kaunda for our partner IIED.)

 ... but at the same time stay true to their values

Absent from the many headlines we regularly see in the media, is news about the millions of rural poor citizens spread across Africa, Asia and Latin America who still lack access to even the most basic energy services. This is unacceptable.

“Universal energy access by 2030 is now within reach”. The title of the International Energy Agency (IEA) press release announcing the Energy Access Outlook 2017 report, released on 19 October, sounds promising. The IEA’s detailed analysis of the status of energy access in the world attributes its optimism to growing political will and declining costs of energy technologies.

As the only female staff working at RESCO, a renewable energy service company established under the Sumba Iconic Island platform, Jetty Arlinda Maro, 26, has to work twice as hard as her male colleagues to prove her capacity. Unlike those men, she is not only responsible for electrical installations, she is also the facilitator and administrator in charge of making sure of the completeness of all the necessary documentations in field offices. In just less than two months, her excellent work results led her to be interviewed by a journalist from Jakarta.   

4,000 female entrepreneurs bring renewable energy to over 2 million people

How do you get sustainable energy solutions for more than 2 million people in the most remote areas of Africa and Asia? And how do you make sure these solutions are really used? The answer is as brilliant as it is simple: appeal to the power of women. Since March 2016, the ENERGIA programme has been hosted by Hivos, and the results speak volumes. So Xenia Wassenbergh of Hivos’ People Unlimited Post sat down with two of the motors behind ENERGIA to find out more.

My father is from Nigeria. In 1967, a terrible civil war broke out in his region. Biafra wanted to proclaim it independence, to which the Nigerian state reacted with bloody slaughter and systematic starvation. Millions of Biafrans died, and images of malnourished children shocked the world.

Cities will dominate the landscape of the future. UN projections indicate that 75 percent of the world’s population will be living in cities by 2050. Africa, in particular, will change from a continent of states to a continent of cities.